How to find your Brazilian Communications agency

If you have a product or service that needs to be better-known by customers, suppliers and other stakeholders in Brazil, it is essential that you find a local PR agency as a partner.

Press relations can be a straightforward process for companies that already have experience in the field, but very complex for those who have never before required such specialized support, especially in different countries, where the culture has a strong influence on business.

Roughly speaking, we can view countries around the world as either having high-context cultures or low-context cultures. This refers to the value cultures place on indirect and direct communication. For high context cultures, communications are implicit and rely heavily on context. By contrast, low-context cultures rely on explicit verbal communication, documents, evidence. High-context cultures value interpersonal relationships that are build slowly and dependent upon trust. As Brazil is an example of a high-context culture, issues may arise that make doing business hard if the company has no previous experience with the country.

If you have already decided to partner with a local communications specialist – congratulations, you are on the right path! However, there are more steps required to ensure success, and this is what I want to recommend by listing three vital tips for those looking to work with a Brazilian agency.

Firstly, and most importantly, you need to hire a PR firm that suits your business in terms of expertise. An agency that works with construction clients, for example, cannot perform properly if you want to launch a new TV cookery channel. The firm must have track-record experience and success within your core industry. One obvious benefit here is that the PR firm will already have links to key journalists, influencers, executives, associations and trade events related to your line of business.

Secondly, I would recommend asking for proposals from at least three different agencies, preferably of different sizes. Each one will offer differing benefits and prices and you must assess their value to you, rather than just bargain for a price . Larger agencies naturally tend to employ a bigger workforce, and the person in charge of an account is normally a junior member of the team. Midsize agencies are different. Normally, the account is run by a more experienced professional, so he or she will talk to your company and the journalist, which greatly facilitates the dialogue. Small-sized agencies tend to deal well with companies that needs more brand awareness. They offer a “boutique” service and will not be as interested in expanding their profile with famous clients. Your account matters to the small agency and you will be served by senior staff or the agency owner, which brings a lot of value to your business.

The third and final tip concerns creativity. The creativity of the agency’s attendant and planner is as or more important than the list of contacts she holds, because there’s no point in having anything to sell without having the right arguments to do so. Therefore, ask your prospective partner to talk about their business cases, how they deal with big topics in your field and to describe the creative process in the agency. This can help you to make a decision about their suitability.

Becoming a trusted cybersecurity partner

Cybersecurity attacks and threats are making global headlines every day. Alongside industry reports of IT leaders lacking confidence in their security posture, we are seeing daily stories about the latest brands or industries to fall victim to sophisticated cybercrime. Recently, news broke on Fat Face’s £1.45million ransom following a phishing attack, while research has found that the UK Higher Education institutions are repeatedly targeted by ransomware attacks. In a time where retail brands have been making just a quarter of typical revenue, and educational facilities are challenged by remote learning demands, cybercrime is an added knockback that could have devastating financial repercussions.

It is no coincidence that the expanding threatscape coincides with society’s increased reliance on technology. Yet, despite the fact we are all turning to digital solutions for work, communication and entertainment, the skills gap remains rife. In fact, according to recent studies, the UK is heading towards ‘a digital skills shortage disaster’, as the number of young people taking IT subjects at GCSE level has dropped by 40% in the last six years. This means that finding the in-house expertise that will ensure a business is protected both day and night is becoming more of a challenge. Not only are there less trained experts available, but the growing level of cybercrime sophistication means that internal SecOps teams struggle to cover all the necessary ground. It will therefore come as no surprise that two thirds of organisations are planning to increase their amount of outsourced cyber resilience in 2021.

Outsourcing security solutions to expert agencies and Managed Security Services Providers (MSSPs) can offer business leaders un-matched peace of mind, allowing them to focus on what really matters. However, as a cybersecurity solutions provider, how do you stand out from the crowd and demonstrate that you are the trusted partner that organisations need to invest in?

Communication is king in becoming valued as trusted partners

Trust in a security vendor isn’t solely about the product, it’s also about reputation and experience. This is where an integrated thought leadership communications programme that engages across multiple platforms, plays a crucial role in showcasing knowledge, expertise and insight, and is a key influencer within any security buyer’s decision making process – the majority of companies consume between 3-5 pieces of content before even engaging with a salesperson.

Becoming seen and heard as a trusted advisor means offering unique points of view on  industry topics, upcoming trends and addressing customer pain points, and is educational content which exemplifies the company’s authority in its field. Prospective clients are ultimately looking for an authoritative voice that can impart industry knowledge and demonstrate why they should be trusted with ownership over the protection of a business’ key assets. Through digesting these insights, prospects begin to realise they may need more information and support. They may also recognise that the services they are currently receiving are not matching up to the knowledge imparted through the content they are consuming. From here, business relationships can be established, and the opportunity then presents itself to convert into long-term customers.

Show where you have succeeded before

Storytelling is a powerful communications tool. Security vendors looking to demonstrate their capabilities to prospective clients should quantify the results of current and previous projects and compile case studies that narrate success and key learnings. Previous success stories should also include proof of the measurable ROI that comes with any investment; the cost of a data breach now currently stands at an average $3.8million, while the expense of implementing in-house 24/7/365 protection is often far beyond what the typical business can afford. So, by highlighting palpable cost savings, alongside improved business security, potential customers will not only see where a security vendor has succeeded before, but be able to relate this success to their own challenges.  

By pairing success stories and quantifiable ROI, alongside quality thought leadership that offer advice and support to the industry and further afield, cybersecurity vendors can begin to establish themselves as trust-worthy partners that have the knowledge, skills and capability to help businesses overcome the increasing threats that lie in cybercrime.

It’s a Matter of Trust: How Security Vendors can Build Trust using PR

Trust and communication are essential to a successful relationship, particularly in business. A company may have a market-leading product, but without the correct promotion, the target audience may be unaware of the brand – let alone trust them – and the offering is redundant. Unfortunately, security vendors aren’t immune to this. In fact, they feel this burden more acutely as they need to build and sell trust.

In light of Cybersecurity Awareness month, we are sharing some of the key takeaways from our survey that investigated buyers’ criteria for selecting a security vendor. It identified communication as a key influencer in securing trust. If you consider that almost 64% of C-Level executives cite cybersecurity as a top priority, you can see why these vendors should seriously rethink their communication tactic, if indeed they have one.

In the battle to win sales, perception is everything. In fact, over 70% of respondents highlighted that a vendor’s media presence is critical in building their trust and loyalty to a particular brand. This doesn’t mean that companies need to dominate the mainstream headlines. Prospects regard trade titles in high esteem as they comprise comprehensive, technical articles specific to their market. For vendors, although offering a fraction of the readership, trade publications provide a targeted approach, often resulting in stronger conversion rates. Manufacturers should also consider who to accredit the content to. Almost 60% of those surveyed favoured articles from technical experts such as CTOs, Security Directors and CSOs. With a deep understanding of the company’s solution, they are considered to have a personal responsibility in the quality and reputation of their company’s offering and therefore more likely to be trusted.

Trade titles are only one piece of the communication puzzle. Being present in industry analyst reports, participating at trade shows and publishing customer case studies all emerged as crucial factors too, indicating the importance of an integrated communication and PR strategy. In fact, almost 50% of respondents considered analyst reports as a reliable source when selecting a vendor. These, along with case studies, comprise informative, accurate and impartial information about a product. In the instance of a case study, this third-party testimonial shines an insightful light on how a particular solution is being deployed by an existing customer.

For many, this advice may seem obvious. Perhaps you’re already deploying PR to a degree although, it’s worth considering how a PR agency can quickly establish trust in your brand, helping you drive sales.

A good PR agency will have knowledge of the wider industrial landscape and relevant target markets, although a great agency will want to truly get to know your business and become an extension of your marketing team. This is in our DNA at Say. We’ve worked with many of our clients for several decades now, helping them to become the trusted provider in their respective fields which we will address in our next blog. For now, I leave you with one final consideration during cybersecurity month – it’s a manufacturer’s responsibility to build trust, while it’s an individual’s decision to trust in it. If you’re considering your marketing plan for next year and want to learn more about how we can help you become the go-to, trusted vendor, contact us.

Why Your Cybersecurity Should Get Physical for National Clean Out Your Computer Day

This week sees the 18th National Clean Out Your Computer Day, and while It may feel like awareness days are popping up everywhere, this is an important one to take notice of, especially if you value keeping your personal data private. After all, to a criminal your personal or work computer can be a gold mine. If a stranger were to get access to your PC, it is possible that they may even learn enough to steal your identity.

Most of the advice given around Clean Out Your Computer Day concerns a modern type of cleaning – however what is more important than a dust cloth and anti-bacterial screen wipes, is having a decent knowledge of data sanitisation. This includes how to clear your browser and download history, turn off the ‘remember me’ setting for your regular passwords and run anti-virus software to make sure your computer is free from malware.

Clean Out Your Computer Day

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Data Privacy in the Age of Alexa

Reading the technology media coverage of both CES 2018 and the post-Christmas sales, it feels like smart devices are finally having their much predicted moment. Every consumer technology vendor seems to have their own take on the smart device, from Amazon and Google’s smart home hubs to Philip’s connected lightbulbs and Samsung’s internet enabled fridge. The rate of ownership of these particular devices may not be that high, with only 18% of UK households reporting owning one, however, if we include other connected devices such as wearables and smartphones, then it becomes very clear that these devices are appearing everywhere.

Internet connected devices have certainly made our lives easier and even have wide reaching potential for making our cities safer and more responsive for example through monitoring pollution and optimising traffic flow. Yet, as Data Privacy Day approaches, it is vital that we consider how all these devices will affect the use and collection of personal data.

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How ‘Human Firewalls’ can protect Organisations from Cyber Threats

Cyber security awareness is now part and parcel of everyday working life. High profile breaches of large organisations such as the NHS, Tescos, Wonga and more recently, again the NHS has driven companies to place more emphasis on employee security awareness and training. Not only do individuals need to be aware that threats exist, they need to be taught how to recognize and react to that threat. But in reality, how many organisations are actually doing this effectively?

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Brexit and Cybersecurity – it’s a Minefield

Whilst businesses and individuals debate the cost and implications of the British public’s vote to Brexit, the cybersecurity community is similarly mulling over its consequences on the sharing of cyber-breach information internationally and what it will mean for cross-border data access.

The major issues we have to face is the General Data Protection Regulation (GDPR); the forfeiture of threat intelligence collaboration with Europe; the potential increasing cost of security (because of the falling value of the pound); and the loss of access to European technical expertise.

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